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 British New Year Traditions

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Silver Tigress
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PostSubject: British New Year Traditions   15/12/2008, 20:25

The first person to cross your threshold after midnight brings luck into the house.

In medieval Britain, the best possible first-footer was a tall dark-haired handsome man, who brought gifts of whisky, bread, a piece of coal or firewood and a silver coin. He entered in silence and no one spoke to him until he put the coal on the fire, poured a glass for the head of the house and wished everyone a Happy New Year. To this day it is customary for a dark-haired man to knock at doors with an offering of a lump of coal and in return is offered the hospitality of the house (hic!)

If this concept doesn't work for you, figure out what would and make sure it happens.

Place a piece of cotton in your sugar bowl to draw good luck to your house on New Years Eve or New Years Day.

AULD LANG SYNE

The song, "Auld Lang Syne," playing in the background, is sung at the stroke of midnight in almost every English-speaking country in the world to bring in the new year. At least partially written by Robert Burns in the 1700's, it was first published in 1796 after Burns' death. Early variations of the song were sung prior to 1700 and inspired Burns to produce the modern rendition. It is an old Scotch tune, "Auld Lang Syne" literally means "old long ago," or simply, "the good old days."

Auld Lang Syne

Should auld acquaintance be forgot
and never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot
and days of auld lang syne?
For auld lang syne, my dear,
for auld lang syne,
we'll take a cup of kindness yet,
for the sake of auld lang syne.

Should auld acquaintance be forgot
and never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot
and days of auld lang syne?
And here's a hand, my trusty friend
And gie's a hand o' thine
We'll tak' a cup o' kindness yet
For the sake of auld lang syne
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